Central Eugene In Motion

Moving people and goods into and through Central Eugene has been an exercise in adaption and change. As Eugene continues to grow, the transportation options available need to adapt to new personal preferences and technologies. Central Eugene In Motion will study the impacts of potential traffic changes and explore an array of street designs


As our greater downtown develops, it is important for Eugene’s transportation network to have safe and comfortable connections regardless if travel is by car, on foot, bike, bus, or personal mobility device.

The Central Eugene In Motion process will explore planned and potential traffic changes with a focus on three key areas:

• Downtown on 8th Ave
• Amazon to Riverfront
• Midtown Willamette Street

The intent of this process is to work with the
community to identify existing transportation issues, explore ideas, and identify preferred design concepts for projects listed in the 2017 Eugene Transportation System Plan.

Possible changes to streets may include removing on-street parking, adding bike lanes, changing traffic controls, or reducing the number of travel lanes.

Our online survey and mapping tool are now closed. We'll use the survey and map feedback in our stakeholder interviews and concept designs

If you have any questions or comments, please use the Q & A tool featured below.

You will be asked to login to your user account before providing your feedback.

If you need some help on the registration process please read this guide.

We'll have more information to share about the project soon.





As our greater downtown develops, it is important for Eugene’s transportation network to have safe and comfortable connections regardless if travel is by car, on foot, bike, bus, or personal mobility device.

The Central Eugene In Motion process will explore planned and potential traffic changes with a focus on three key areas:

• Downtown on 8th Ave
• Amazon to Riverfront
• Midtown Willamette Street

The intent of this process is to work with the
community to identify existing transportation issues, explore ideas, and identify preferred design concepts for projects listed in the 2017 Eugene Transportation System Plan.

Possible changes to streets may include removing on-street parking, adding bike lanes, changing traffic controls, or reducing the number of travel lanes.

Our online survey and mapping tool are now closed. We'll use the survey and map feedback in our stakeholder interviews and concept designs

If you have any questions or comments, please use the Q & A tool featured below.

You will be asked to login to your user account before providing your feedback.

If you need some help on the registration process please read this guide.

We'll have more information to share about the project soon.




Have a questions about the Central Eugene in Motion study, or one of the three specific project areas? Drop us a question! 

Q&A

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  • Is the city considered partially closing off some streets to make dedicated biking commuting corridors? This would alleviate the great number of bikes on main streets and provide safer corridors for bikers.

    davidglewis asked 27 days ago

    Greetings!  The streets in the study areas have a number of destinations on them (civic buildings, commercial uses, workplaces, etc.) that attract bicycle trips.  As many of those "main streets" already provide bicycling facilities, our intention is to improve safety and operation of those facilities.  However, there is a facility class type called "neighborhood greenways" that provide diversion of automobile traffic to make cycling more comfortable.  Unfortunately, the connectivity of these streets tends to be complicated by circuitous routing and crossings of busy streets.  All of those treatments also require significant investment.  At this point, many options are on the table, but focus is on making the existing facilities feel more comfortable and operate safer.

    Reed Dunbar

    City of Eugene

  • Is this process re-evaluating the proposed two-way bike highway on High St.? That plan was highly anticipated by the active transportation community and a major change to connectivity and ease of flow would be disappointing. Could you provide more detail on the proposed connection from Amazon to the Riverfront for active transportation?

    KevinG asked about 2 months ago

    Hello.  The connection from the Amazon Path to the Riverbank Path is being explored anew.  While there was a project scheduled to construct a two-way bikeway on High Street, it did not address some of the existing issues experienced on Pearl Street (crashes), nor did it examine the tradeoffs that providing a two-way bikeway on High Street might produce.  The Central Eugene in Motion project is looking at the best way to connect people riding bikes along the Pearl/High couplet.  We'll have alternatives to review for each corridor at the October 22nd Open House.  I hope you can attend.

    Reed Dunbar

    City of Eugene

  • What plans are in the works to improve traffic along Coburg/Ferry St Bridge area? Traffic is worsening, and there are many new housing developments going in that need to use this corridor to get to the downtown, university, or south Eugene area.

    dancinghenz asked about 2 months ago

    Greetings!  There are several approaches that cities use to address traffic congestion.  Below, I'll discuss what the City of Eugene is doing about increased traffic pressure.

    Driving: City Traffic Engineers are looking at corridors like River Road and Coburg Road to improve the traffic progression at signalized intersections.  This may include the installation of smart signals that coordinate with each other to improve traffic flow.  Roundabouts are another device that could become more popular in Eugene over the next few years.

    Walking/Bicycling: there is a project in the Coburg Road area called NE Livable Streets that will improve the crossings of arterial streets so that people walking and bicycling on the local street network can cross busy arterial streets.  This project will start either this fall or next spring.

    Transit: there is a transportation study in progress called MovingAhead that is looking at frequent transit networks and Coburg Road is one of the corridors being analyzed.  One way to lessen traffic congestion on Coburg Road is to reduce the number of cars being used - frequent transit may be an option for some folks who are currently driving.

    Reed Dunbar

    City of Eugene

  • What is the purpose of making 8th ave a two way street? Would it be possible to have a planted center medium strip? Why isn’t focus on the great streets like broadway?

    Confidential asked about 2 months ago

    Thanks for the question.  The Downtown Plan (2004) identifies 4 "great streets" that emphasize placemaking.  Those streets include 5th Avenue, 8th Avenue, Broadway, and Willamette.  Currently, portions of 8th Avenue lack streetscape elements, such as those found on Broadway, that make it a more inviting place to walk, ride a bike, or provide cafe seating.  

    8th Avenue was included in the voter-approved pavement bond measure passed in 2017.  So, the street will be rebuilt which provides an opportunity to make it into a great street.  Part of the great street concept is linking together existing and planned open spaces from the Park Blocks to the Federal Courthouse.  To facilitate connectivity, the street will be converted to two-way.

    A two-way traffic operation enhances local access for all vehicles, including emergency vehicles and delivery trucks, and reduces the extra travel that out-of-direction one way streets may cause.  Two-way streets in downtown have been identified in the Downtown Plan as a way to improve travel around downtown, whereas one way streets prioritize travel through downtown.

    Planted median strips, like the one on Broadway, have been met with some criticism by emergency services because it narrows the street making deployment of equipment more difficult.  It is more likely that vegetated stormwater planters and tree wells will be placed at the curbs near the sidewalk in the new design based on current best practices.  However, planted medians can still be considered where they do not impede emergency access.  

    Reed Dunbar

    City of Eugene

  • Hello, I represent Tillman Family Dental on 20th and Willamette. Our main question is what kind of parking options would there be if street parking is removed in our area? Perhaps options at the new civic alliance facility? We have a three car lot for patients, but our employees and some overflow utilize the street parking quite often. We have excitement and some concern with the updating of the area, thanks for letting us ask questions. Also, once construction begins we are hoping that there will be some limited access to our business lot due to the fact we have some patients in wheelchairs or that need a close walking distance to the office. Thanks

    Tillman Family Dental asked about 2 months ago

    Greetings, thanks for submitting your question.  The public involvement process is identifying many tradeoffs that will need to be considered when evaluating alternative street designs.  First, let me say that there is a no-change option available for the entire Midtown Willamette area, so it's not a given that changes will occur (aside from new pavement and curb ramps).  Having said that, we are hearing that some folks would like better connectivity when driving or bicycling, and that on-street parking is an important consideration.  Given limitations to the right-of-way, it is likely that some alternatives may present the option of removing some on-street parking, while others do not.  We'll present some options at the October 22nd Open House, and online on engage.eugene-or.gov platform.

    As for construction, we strive to ensure that access to driveways is maintained throughout construction or that minimal interruptions occur.  We also have requirements for ADA pedestrian access throughout the construction process.  We'll follow up with adjacent properties during the design process to determine individual access needs.

    Reed Dunbar

    City of Eugene