Middle Housing

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Where We Are Now

Public Engagement:

Planning Commission has approved the project's Public Involvement Plan and we are now beginning our outreach. This fall, outreach efforts will include a Boards and Commissions Roundtable, Local Partners Roundtable, Equity Roundtable, Healthy Democracy Community Review Panel, and more! This page will provide project updates, important dates, and engagement tools like surveys. Our first opportunity is a storytelling tool, below, to share your middle housing story. Stay tuned for updates and opportunities to engage.

Complying With The Law:

House Bill 2001 was adopted last year by the Oregon legislature and now the State's Department of Planning (Department of Land Conservation and Development or DLCD) is in charge of creating two things: 1) a model code that cities can directly adopt and 2) minimum standards for compliance with the bill for cities that would like to write their own code standards. The model code and minimum standards are expected to be finalized by the end of the 2020 calendar year. In the meantime, we are focusing on developing project Guiding Values and Principles. These will be established by various roundtable groups listed above. The next phase will begin in Winter when we will share the final state minimum standards and code concepts for your feedback.

We Want To Know What You Think!

If you have a middle housing story, please share it below. If you have questions or input, please use the Q & A tool featured below. You will be asked to register or log in to your user account before providing your feedback. If you need some help with the registration process please read this guide


Project Background

The City of Eugene is experiencing a housing crisis and is identified as a severely rent-burdened community. Low vacancy rates, rising housing prices and lower than state average wages are creating a dynamic that leaves both existing and new community members struggling to find local housing that meets their basic needs.

A lack of housing affordability and availability is a statewide problem not unique to Eugene. In recognition of this statewide issue, the Oregon legislature passed House Bill (HB) 2001 in 2019, with the goal of increasing housing choice in single-family neighborhoods. Implementation of HB 2001 is an important component in the City’s ongoing work related to housing.HB 2001 is intended to provide more opportunities for a variety of housing types in traditionally single-family neighborhoods and to increase the overall housing supply in and around cities.

No later than June 30, 2022, Eugene and other cities with populations of 50,000+ must amend the City’s land use regulations to allow:

A duplex on each lot or parcel:
  • That is located within city limits;
  • That is zoned for residential use; and
  • On which the City’s land use regulations allows the construction of a detached single-family dwelling; and

Triplexes, quadplexes, cottage clusters, and townhouses in residential zones within the City that allow detached single-family dwellings.



The Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD) is drafting and adopting minimum standards for complying with the bill as well as a model code. Eugene has until June 30, 2022 to adopt changes to the city’s land-use regulations that comply with DLCD’s minimum standards.

For more information about House Bill 2001, visit the project webpage.

Where We Are Now

Public Engagement:

Planning Commission has approved the project's Public Involvement Plan and we are now beginning our outreach. This fall, outreach efforts will include a Boards and Commissions Roundtable, Local Partners Roundtable, Equity Roundtable, Healthy Democracy Community Review Panel, and more! This page will provide project updates, important dates, and engagement tools like surveys. Our first opportunity is a storytelling tool, below, to share your middle housing story. Stay tuned for updates and opportunities to engage.

Complying With The Law:

House Bill 2001 was adopted last year by the Oregon legislature and now the State's Department of Planning (Department of Land Conservation and Development or DLCD) is in charge of creating two things: 1) a model code that cities can directly adopt and 2) minimum standards for compliance with the bill for cities that would like to write their own code standards. The model code and minimum standards are expected to be finalized by the end of the 2020 calendar year. In the meantime, we are focusing on developing project Guiding Values and Principles. These will be established by various roundtable groups listed above. The next phase will begin in Winter when we will share the final state minimum standards and code concepts for your feedback.

We Want To Know What You Think!

If you have a middle housing story, please share it below. If you have questions or input, please use the Q & A tool featured below. You will be asked to register or log in to your user account before providing your feedback. If you need some help with the registration process please read this guide


Project Background

The City of Eugene is experiencing a housing crisis and is identified as a severely rent-burdened community. Low vacancy rates, rising housing prices and lower than state average wages are creating a dynamic that leaves both existing and new community members struggling to find local housing that meets their basic needs.

A lack of housing affordability and availability is a statewide problem not unique to Eugene. In recognition of this statewide issue, the Oregon legislature passed House Bill (HB) 2001 in 2019, with the goal of increasing housing choice in single-family neighborhoods. Implementation of HB 2001 is an important component in the City’s ongoing work related to housing.HB 2001 is intended to provide more opportunities for a variety of housing types in traditionally single-family neighborhoods and to increase the overall housing supply in and around cities.

No later than June 30, 2022, Eugene and other cities with populations of 50,000+ must amend the City’s land use regulations to allow:

A duplex on each lot or parcel:
  • That is located within city limits;
  • That is zoned for residential use; and
  • On which the City’s land use regulations allows the construction of a detached single-family dwelling; and

Triplexes, quadplexes, cottage clusters, and townhouses in residential zones within the City that allow detached single-family dwellings.



The Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD) is drafting and adopting minimum standards for complying with the bill as well as a model code. Eugene has until June 30, 2022 to adopt changes to the city’s land-use regulations that comply with DLCD’s minimum standards.

For more information about House Bill 2001, visit the project webpage.

Tell us your middle housing stories!

Have you ever lived in a middle housing type? If so, we'd like to hear your stories. Here are some examples of middle housing. Below them are your stories.

Accessory Dwelling Unit

Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs) are small housing structures built on a lot in addition to a primary residence. ADUs go by many names: secondary dwelling unit, backyard cottage, mother-in-law suite, and granny flat. ADUs can be either attached or detached from the main house. Attached ADUs are often located in a basement, top floor, or directly to the side of a house. These units must share a wall or ceiling with the main house, be smaller than 800 square feet, and not be taller than the primary residence. Detached ADUs can be found inside or above a detached garage or as a home in the backyard.  

Duplex

A duplex is a housing structure that contains two separated dwellings each with its own entrance. The word, “duplex,” comes from Latin, “du” meaning two and “plex” which means to fold together. This structure is also called a “twin home,” “semi-detached home,” “paired home” or “two-family dwelling.” Often, two units with a duplex will have an identical layout, architectural style, and square footage. There are a few different kinds of duplexes: side-by-side units, one unit on top of the other, or a "craftsman duplex" that looks like a single-family house. Duplexes can provide a less dense option for renting often with some open space, later-in-life downsizing, or additional rental income.

Triplex

A triplex is a middle housing structure type that contains three distinct dwellings on a single lot. The name triplex comes from Latin meaning ‘threefold.’ Commonly, a triplex has three separate entrances, and the living spaces are connected by shared walls. They may also have one entrance that leads into a hallway with two units on the bottom floor and one larger unit on the top floor. Alternately, a triplex may have one unit per floor.


Fourplex

A fourplex, also known as a quadplex, is a middle housing structure that contains four separate dwelling units on a residential lot. Fourplexes come in all different shapes and sizes; some are single-story, and some are 2-4 stories tall. Units within a fourplex can have a compact, cozy feel and often share walls with the other units. However, these units are usually distinct; each with separate entrances.


Rowhouse

Rowhouses are a unique type of middle housing because they feature several adjoined yet distinct housing structures. Commonly, rowhouses are made up of three to seven houses in a row, ranging from two to three stories tall. There are many different architectural layouts and styles for rowhouses, making them customizable to most lot sizes. Rowhouses share common walls and a sidewalk. Additionally, there is an option to include detached rowhouses that look like a bungalow or cottage.


Cottage Cluster


Cottage Clusters are an innovative type of middle housing because they allow multiple detached structures to exist on a lot. Commonly, this housing type features two to six small cottages that do not exceed a total of 1000 square feet. The entrances to the cottages either face a shared open space or face the street. This style of housing creates a wonderful living community where cottage residents can meet and connect in the shared open space.



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    Finding Our Duplex

    19 days ago

    I arrived in Eugene a little over 2 years ago to join my partner. Knowing how expensive the rental market is, moving to Eugene was extremely intimidating (not to mention living together for the first time after years and years long distance). Being lovers of the outdoors, we wanted to find a nice spot, with some pretty trees, in an active neighborhood, and a space for all our bikes and various adventure gear. We were both employed full time, had spent time hammering out a detailed budget, but our hearts sank as we saw rental prices for what we considered... Continue reading

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    Returning to Eugene for Multi-generational living, Thanks to HB2001

    by TShorack, 27 days ago

    My wife and I grew up in Eugene in the 1960's and 70's. After graduating from the U of O and shooting news for a local TV station, I moved my young family to southern California for better work opportunities in 1985. In Pasadena we lived in a 1915 Craftsman (725 SF) behind our friends in a 1350 SF Craftsman home. Eastern families had brought their butlers or in-laws to winter in Pasadena a century ago, and had built so many front house/back house Craftsman properties that our Pasadena neighborhood was called "Bungalow Heaven." We thrived there with daily contact... Continue reading

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    My first home in Eugene

    about 1 month ago

    My first home in Eugene was a side by side duplex in the Jefferson-Westside neighborhood. My landlord lived next door, and having a close in, homey place to live made my move to Eugene to attend graduate school painless. Once I completed my degree, I was fortunate enough to land a downtown job where I could commute by walking. The building was constructed in the 1920s, before auto-oriented design took over, and the huge big leaf maple trees and setback sidewalk were key attractants for me as a young planning student and emerging professional. If this duplex were for sale... Continue reading

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    My summer in an ADU

    about 1 month ago

    A couple of summers ago I was preparing to graduate from college and wanted to stay in Eugene. I had 2 pieces of furniture and was looking for a small space to share with my partner—our first home together. Up until then, I had always had roommates in houses near the college. I was excited to look at neighborhoods around Eugene and explore where we could live. My partner and I love to ride bikes and, at the time, were sharing a car. It was important to us to find a home near the bicycle network, in a walkable neighborhood... Continue reading