Jefferson Street Traffic Calming

Jefferson Street Traffic Calming Project AreaIn response to neighborhood concerns about speeding traffic on Jefferson between 13th and 28th avenues and a history of traffic, we're constructing a traffic calming project late in 2020 or early next year. We'll share details of the project, which could include speed cushions on Jefferson Street, between 13th and 28th avenues, and listen to neighbors about concerns they may have.

The intent of the traffic calming project is to address speeding traffic and improve the comfort and safety of the people using the street. Jefferson Street has been identified as a Vision Zero corridor where efforts are focused to reduce crashes and improve safety for all people using the street.

We held a community meeting on February 26 where we shared more about the project (thanks to all those who came to the meeting). You can download the community presentation here. We also have an image of the approximate locations of the speed cushions.

We'll use the comments collected at the community meeting and through the comment tool below to help us inform our final decision.

What is a speed cushion?

Speed Cushion on Avalon StreetSpeed cushions slow traffic like speed humps while also allowing emergency vehicles to move through the area. We have installed speed humps in many different areas around the city including nearby Lincoln and Friendly streets.

More information about traffic calming is available at: https://www.eugene-or.gov/1729/Traffic-Calming.


Jefferson Street Traffic Calming Project AreaIn response to neighborhood concerns about speeding traffic on Jefferson between 13th and 28th avenues and a history of traffic, we're constructing a traffic calming project late in 2020 or early next year. We'll share details of the project, which could include speed cushions on Jefferson Street, between 13th and 28th avenues, and listen to neighbors about concerns they may have.

The intent of the traffic calming project is to address speeding traffic and improve the comfort and safety of the people using the street. Jefferson Street has been identified as a Vision Zero corridor where efforts are focused to reduce crashes and improve safety for all people using the street.

We held a community meeting on February 26 where we shared more about the project (thanks to all those who came to the meeting). You can download the community presentation here. We also have an image of the approximate locations of the speed cushions.

We'll use the comments collected at the community meeting and through the comment tool below to help us inform our final decision.

What is a speed cushion?

Speed Cushion on Avalon StreetSpeed cushions slow traffic like speed humps while also allowing emergency vehicles to move through the area. We have installed speed humps in many different areas around the city including nearby Lincoln and Friendly streets.

More information about traffic calming is available at: https://www.eugene-or.gov/1729/Traffic-Calming.


Have a question about the Jefferson Street Traffic Calming project? Share your thoughts with project managers and we'll get back to you. 

Question about the project?

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  • I agree that speeding on Jefferson is a real safety issue and that traffic calming is a good idea. However, I’m very concerned about the impact it will have on Madison (and Monroe), the only two North-South streets without calming in the area between Chambers, 28th, Jefferson, and 24th. A lot of cars already take shortcuts on Madison to avoid congestion at Jefferson and 28th (a really dangerous intersection), and many of them zip through at 35 to 40mph, way too fast. Madison is a major pedestrian route as people feel safe using the street. I don’t have any hard evidence but it sure seems like when the calming went in on 24th traffic increased on Madison. That makes sense because so many cars come down off of the hills. Instead of taking Chambers to 24th and over to UO, Roosevelt, South High, etc. they can take 28th and the Madison shortcut. One other thing I would like to add is that the design of the calming speed bumps on 24th causes many cars to veer around them into the bike lanes. I use the road a lot and I see this happening a lot. If the bumps extended across the entire road then the behavior could be prevented and the risk of a bike or kid walking in the bikeline getting hit reduced.

    ETJ asked about 1 month ago

    Thank you for sharing your concerns about effects of previous traffic calming projects and what may happen as a result of adding traffic calming to Jefferson Street. The Friendly Area Neighbors have a committee that actively meets to discuss concerns about traffic. That group helps to prioritize the neighborhood concerns about speeding and where to deploy traffic calming. Because resources are limited, we work to address the most egregious speeding problems first and on streets with a history of crashes. In developing the City of Eugene Vision Zero Action Plan, Jefferson Street was identified as part of the high crash network due to crashes resulting in injury or death. More information about the Vision Zero program may be found at: https://www.eugene-or.gov/4270/Vision-Zero. More information about the traffic calming program may be found at: https://www.eugene-or.gov/1729/Traffic-Calming.

    Thanks,

    Chris Henry, PE

    Transportation Planning Engineer


  • I am a nearby resident sandwiched between Friendly Street on the West and Jefferson on the East...at 22nd and Monroe Streets. We have lived here for 25 plus years and I have to say that I hope you get it right. The traffic calming installed on Friendly Street years ago was done improperly and cause most Emergency and other oversized vehicles to travel up and down adjoining streets instead of using Friendly.The task of calming traffic on Friendly was accomplished I guess, but not in a neighborhood friendly manner at all. We have experienced an increase in traffic spill over because of the height of the current speed calming bumps installed on Friendly Street. When contacted about concerns, the City Personnel I spoke with confirmed that the speed bumps had issue with height. [This conversation took place years ago.] So, what do we have now on Friendly? Much too tall speed calming additions added to a fairly well- consistently traveled feeder road and everyone in the neighborhood has to live with the questionable decision to do "something" to calm traffic. It became apparent that a re-do wasn't going to be funded to correct the speed bumps. It's not lost on me that it's a big job to remove and replace the much too steep in height Friendly Street speed bumps. That's the impetus for my writing today: I hope that the Jefferson project gets done' correctly with eyes wide open regarding how it will impact people who use Jefferson Street by vehicle. I agree that speed is an issue on Jefferson as is the case in many residential neighborhoods. These "cushions" look like they could be possibly problematic- namely: how sturdy are they and what will be the expiration of such cushions, [ will they flatten over time ? ] It looks like drivers with regularly sized wheel bases will drive over the cushion but large vehicles will be able to navigate them without touching the cushions...because of their wider wheel base? If so, the larger vehicular traffic might not slow down- at all ... I drive up and down Jefferson frequently and I always wonder WHY didn't the City "Planners" widen Jefferson or remove on street parking in some sections of the length of the road? It is a pretty tight street to navigate especially with the amount of traffic that utilizes Jefferson Street - plus LTD uses it as well ! There are parking strips running all the way down from 28th to 13th where a widening could have provided space for parking cars and a safe travel for everyone. Especially if the road were widened only in spots [ bump outs, I guess ] and the wider spots could be utilized for neighbors parking. It's been surprising to me that this wasn't part of the Jefferson Street paving project that took place recently. I am guessing that opinions were sought about the traffic calming ideas that are being considered? I admit that I am not aware of past meetings on the calming subject but I do encourage the Engineering Department of Public Works do an additional "reach out" throughout the community and share what is on the table making sure that it can be modified if neighbors have concerns about the "style" of calming details being considered. Eugene residents, especially those who travel up and down Jefferson on a daily basis should be a direct part of this decision in some way. Reach out further to make clear what the calming features will be that Public Works/Engineering are considering using- Everyone sharing ideas can help ensure that another mistake isn't made... I will offer my two cents: What about the calming feature put on E. 34th or E. 32nd in South Eugene, running from Donald to Amazon? They seem to work pretty well- What I am referring to are the center diamonds and bump outs. When I drive on this road it seems easy enough to navigate and I find that they do calm traffic. My apologies for being a little negative or pushy, I obviously have some leftover feelings about Friendly Streets Calming practices. Thank You, Debbie Summers

    Olive asked about 1 month ago

    Thank you for sharing your neighborhood history and concern about the traffic calming, old and new. The traffic calming projects on nearby Friendly and Lincoln streets were installed many decades ago and were some of the first speed humps built. We’ve established standards for their construction to yield consistent results. Some of the Friendly Street speed humps were reconstructed with a paving project a few years ago and should be matching or standard height of 3 inches.

    We have new tools available now that we didn’t when we started our traffic calming program in the late ‘80s/early ‘90s. Specifically, traffic calming speed cushions are relatively new. They are constructed of the same materials (usually asphalt) as speed humps and follow the same shape. The difference with speed cushions is that they have cutouts for the wheel-path of emergency vehicles. These larger emergency vehicles are wider than typical passenger cars and can straddle the speed cushion whereas a passenger car cannot. Depending on the design, we can also place the speed cushions to discourage people from trying to bypass them. We have measured speed reductions of four to six miles per hour with speed cushions on recent projects. Speed cushions are durable, effective at speed reduction, and allow for emergency services.

    While everyone may not agree, Jefferson Street is adequately wide enough for two travel lanes and two parking lanes. The absence of parked cars on the street make it appear wider and contribute to higher traveled speeds. In some cases, curbs may be extended into the street to shadow the parked cars (or absence of parked cars) to effectively narrow the street and encourage lower traveled speeds. Those measures are more expensive and less effective at calming traffic than speed humps or speed cushions. We haven’t built very many streets from scratch lately, but as we do, we typically include traffic calming design elements to encourage a travelled speed consistent with the context of the land uses nearby.

    The Friendly Area Neighbors have been very active in advocating for traffic calming in the neighborhood over the years. They have spoken as individuals and as a neighborhood association in their request for relief from people driving too fast in the neighborhood. Another concern that they have raised is how the neighborhood is disconnected by missing sidewalk segments. Filling in the gaps of missing sidewalks in neighborhoods has been an ongoing funding issue.

    In developing the City of Eugene Vision Zero Action Plan, Jefferson Street was identified as part of the high crash network due to crashes resulting in injury or death. More information about the Vision Zero program may be found at: https://www.eugene-or.gov/4270/Vision-Zero. More information about the traffic calming program may be found at: https://www.eugene-or.gov/1729/Traffic-Calming.

    Thanks again for sharing your views here. If you are able, please plan to attend the community meeting on February 26, 2020.

    Chris Henry, PE

    Transportation Planning Engineer


  • I've seen MUCH faster and pervasive speeding on west 29th between Willamette and the Lorane Highway curve than I've ever noticed on Jefferson. I live on west 29th, but I drive Jefferson several times a week. Why does Jefferson get "Vision Zero" status but not a street (29th west of Willamette) that flanks an elementary school that will be 'occupied' for at least the next four years?

    cash428 asked about 2 months ago

    Thank you for sharing your experience of people speeding on 29th Avenue and asking about how streets are identified as part of the Vision Zero network in Eugene. The Vision Zero network identifies street corridors and prioritizes those that have a demonstrated history of crashes that result in fatalities or injuries. Speed may be a contributing factor, but the prioritization is based on data that shows harm to people through crashes. Jefferson Street is part of the Vision Zero network for these reasons. There is also a demonstrated problem with people driving too fast on Jefferson Street that qualifies the street for traffic calming. While many streets may present safety concerns and may also qualify for traffic calming, we are focused on addressing the most egregious problems first with a data-driven approach within the financial resources available. More information about the Vision Zero program may be found at: https://www.eugene-or.gov/4270/Vision-Zero. More information about the traffic calming program may be found at: https://www.eugene-or.gov/1729/Traffic-Calming.

    Thanks,

    Chris Henry, PE

    Transportation Planning Engineer