Climate Action Plan (CAP) 2.0

This picture describes the Climate Recovery Ordinance Goals of reducing fossil fuel use by 50% by 2030 and reducing greenhouse gases by 7.6% annually by 2100.

The Eugene City Council passed the Climate Recovery Ordinance (CRO) in 2014, making a bold statement by setting ambitious climate goals and incorporating them into Eugene City Code. These goals include a science-based projection that returning to 350ppm CO2e will limit the earth’s warming to 1 degree C. This plan, Eugene’s Community Climate Action Plan 2.0, is an update to Eugene’s 2010 Community Climate and Energy Action Plan and serves as Eugene’s climate action roadmap. The Plan format is different from the 2010 CEAP, focusing on actions that community partners have committed to working on and clearly identifying other high impact actions that the community will need to find additional resources to complete.

Gap Strategy Survey

An important part of the CAP2.0 playbook is the "Gap Strategies" described in Appendix 6. City Council will be deliberating a series of policy options that can help reduce greenhouse gas emissions locally. Before taking the quiz check out Appendix 6 and read about Eugene's locally produced emissions in the 2017 Greenhouse Gas Inventory.

2017 Greenhouse Gas Inventory Sources

NOTE: residential and commercial include both natural gas- and electricity-based emissions




By examining the sources of our local emissions and best practices developed by cities around the world, City Council will have the opportunity to make policy choices that will reduce emissions and make Eugene a more equitable and livable community.






The Eugene City Council passed the Climate Recovery Ordinance (CRO) in 2014, making a bold statement by setting ambitious climate goals and incorporating them into Eugene City Code. These goals include a science-based projection that returning to 350ppm CO2e will limit the earth’s warming to 1 degree C. This plan, Eugene’s Community Climate Action Plan 2.0, is an update to Eugene’s 2010 Community Climate and Energy Action Plan and serves as Eugene’s climate action roadmap. The Plan format is different from the 2010 CEAP, focusing on actions that community partners have committed to working on and clearly identifying other high impact actions that the community will need to find additional resources to complete.

Gap Strategy Survey

An important part of the CAP2.0 playbook is the "Gap Strategies" described in Appendix 6. City Council will be deliberating a series of policy options that can help reduce greenhouse gas emissions locally. Before taking the quiz check out Appendix 6 and read about Eugene's locally produced emissions in the 2017 Greenhouse Gas Inventory.

2017 Greenhouse Gas Inventory Sources

NOTE: residential and commercial include both natural gas- and electricity-based emissions




By examining the sources of our local emissions and best practices developed by cities around the world, City Council will have the opportunity to make policy choices that will reduce emissions and make Eugene a more equitable and livable community.






  • The 2016 Climate Recovery Ordinance (CRO) sets a greenhouse gas goal of an average emissions reduction of 7.6%& per year until 2100.

    Based on the community's 2017 emissions of approximately 1,000,000 MT C02e, the CRO calls for a 2030 goal of about 360,000 MT CO2e. Based on current ghg reduction plans the 2030 ghg emissions will be about 830,000 (40% of the goal). This is an impressive step towards our goal but additional strategies need to be considered to reduce the community's carbon emissions even further. 

    Local Emission Sources (2017)

    Source MTCO2e Percentage

    The 2016 Climate Recovery Ordinance (CRO) sets a greenhouse gas goal of an average emissions reduction of 7.6%& per year until 2100.

    Based on the community's 2017 emissions of approximately 1,000,000 MT C02e, the CRO calls for a 2030 goal of about 360,000 MT CO2e. Based on current ghg reduction plans the 2030 ghg emissions will be about 830,000 (40% of the goal). This is an impressive step towards our goal but additional strategies need to be considered to reduce the community's carbon emissions even further. 

    Local Emission Sources (2017)

    Source MTCO2e Percentage
    Electricity 24,549 2.4%
    Natural Gas 282,134 27.8%
    Transportation Fuels
    (Diesel and Gasoline)
    532,685 52.6%
    Waste and Refrigerant Loss 153,433 15.1%


    Policy options for future ghg reductions listed below are broken down into energy used in buildings (electricity and natural gas), transportation, and other.


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